Timothy L. Drobnick Sr.  Tim's Success Stories
Chapter: 1
Title: "The Business End of a Two by Four"
Author: Timothy L. Drobnick Sr.
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Timothy L. Drobnick Sr. owner womVegas.com, womTown.com, TimsSuccessStories.com
It was a plastic yellow boat and I was approaching all the neighbor kids offering it to them for only a nickel. I don't remember why I wanted a nickel, there probably was nothing I wanted to buy but something inside said I wanted a nickel.

My mother caught me before I had made a sale and told me I was not allowed to sell my toys. Later that evening I heard her telling my father that I needed an allowance.

This was 1966 and I was seven years old. My father agreed to give me a quarter each week which was not always possible, but most weeks I would receive a quarter. However, I had already been bitten by the sales bug. Selling a yellow plastic boat for a nickel seemed a lot more fun than getting a quarter handed to you for nothing.

My family was very religious and believed in giving a "tithe" or 10% of their income to the church so father instructed me to do the same.

Since 10% of 25 cents was not possible to put in the church plate, I had to put in 3 cents. That extra half cent to God kind of cheesed me off but I wanted to keep my parents happy and I believed they knew what was right.

My favorite purchase with my allowance was two comic books one of which was 10 cents and the other was 15 cents. Since I had to give 3 cents of my ill begotten gains to the Lord, (church), I could not get both of these comic books each week. I would buy one, save the extra money and then the following week I could purchase both.

After a while I became more excited about owning a dollar bill than I did a comic book. And I started saving my quarters, or rather my 22 cents after God's take, waiting to buy myself a crisp one-dollar bill.

To speed this process up I tried to talk my father into giving me my allowance every 2 weeks so that I would receive 50 cents and only have to give 5 cents to the preacher's plate, thus saving myself 2 cents every month. But my dad would not go for this.

Finally after about 7 weeks of saving, (some weeks dad could not afford 25 cents), I reached my goal and walked into the kitchen with $1.00 in change.

"Mom I want to buy a dollar bill from you," I exclaimed. Mom looked rather surprised and my father seemed proud. Mother did the transaction and I held up my first paper dollar bill ever.

"That is just not fair" my younger sister and brother pouted. "We want a dollar also!"

My brother and sister also received 25 cents allowance but never saved any of it. Mom and dad tried to explain to them that I had saved my money but they could not be convinced I was not receiving favorable treatment.

I wanted to earn more money but mother's ban on selling toys left me looking for other opportunties. One day the neighbor boys were sitting out behind a table with Koolaid in a pitcher and paper cups. I went over to see if they were being kind and giving it away but they said the price was 3 cents.

3 cents! That is ludicrous I thought. But I watched as people walking by would hand over 3 wonderful pennies and receive that cold tasty cup of Koolaid.

Bing! My head snapped toward the house as my feet came following as fast as they could. "Mom I want to sell Koolaid!"

Mother helped me get set up and quickly I was looking at the street with a big smile on my face, a pitcher of koolaid and small plastic cups.

"What do you think you are up to!" Roger said. Roger was one of the neighbor boys selling Koolaid.

"Why I am going to make money too" I retorted. "Not on our watch" the boys said and they picked up a short two by four board and started smashing my table, business, and dreams of unlimited money. That was the end of my sales career for a while, my mother would not let me participate in that dangerous world.

My life went on as such but by fourth grade the bug to start selling and making money on my own was crunching on my skin until I had to do something about it.



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Copyright 2002 thru 2013. All rights reserved. Duplication of these stories are not allowed in any form.
Timothy L. Drobnick Sr.  Tim's Success Stories
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